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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
for syria's president. our concerns is increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons. chemical weapons against his own people and president obama has said if that happens, there will be consequences. tonight, the concerns and the reality inside syria. this military man lost custody of his little girl when his foreign wife divorced him and left the country. >> i just literally had about 20 minutes to say goodbye to my daughter. >> harris: now, the supreme court taking a case that could mean a lot for military families. plus, dogs, learning how to drive cars. shifting. >> good boy. >> steering. >> good. >> accelerating. cats of the world consider yourselves warned. i'm harris faulkner in tonight for shepard smith. we are learning u.s. forces could soon be headed to the syrian border. their mission part of nato's plan to put patriot missiles at the line between turkey and syria. those patriots are designed to intercept any potential missiles coming from syria. and defense officials say any country that sends its equipment is likely to send their own troops to operate it
imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to speculate or comment on what those potential consequences would be. it's fair enough to say that use of those weapons would cross a led line for us. >> [inaudible] >> intelligence we have raises serious concerns this is being consideredded. >> [inaudible] >> barbara, i think you know the president's decided that the ve
disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this confl
concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe his weapons are safe from a potential military action by anyone? >> well,ñ&r without commenting n specific intelligence we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as]u> barbara, i think the president's decided that the veterans apair fair -- affairs is exempted from sequesteration. i also say as we look at that as great news as the p
schumer and republican bob corker. then the u.s. draws a red line telling syrian president assad not to use chemical weapons in that country's civil war. we'll discuss the latest intelligence and fallout with michael oren. a fox news sunday exclusive. plus the supreme court agrees to take up same-sex marriage. we'll ask our sunday panel if the court is likely do decide whether gays have a constitutional right to marry and a final farewell to my best friend winston, all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington. it's beginning to feel like groundhog day in the talks of the fiscal cliff. both sides dug in, no agreement in sight and we're 23 days from the brink. join us to break down where it stands, two leader senators, charles schumer and bob corker. house speaker boehner said friday another week has been wasted. given president obama won the election and seems to have most of the political leverage, what's the realistic deal to be made in the next 23 days? >> first of all i think something's going to happen. i hope it's large enough for people who wa
concerns this week that the assad government is moving closer to the use of chemical weapons. jeffrey brown has that part of the story. >> brown: the syrian civil war has now closed in on president bashar al-assad's seat of power, with rebel gunfire ringing out again today in damascus. amateur video also showed new shelling in the capital, as government forces continued a push to retake key suburbs. and while the noise of war grows louder in damascus, so have fears around the world that assad may resort to chemical weapons. the syrian government has a number of sites containing what may be the largest chemical weapons stockpile in the world. it's made up largely of sarin nerve gas, mustard gas and cyanide. on monday, president obama sounded a warning, amid reports of unusual activity at the weapon sites. >> the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> reporter: assad's regime answered that it would never use such weapons against it
on bashar al-assad part to underestimate him. >> rose: robert gate for the hour, next. >> charlie rose was provided by the following. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert gates is here, hhe has had a distinguished career in public service spanning six decades and served under eight presidents from lyndon johnson to barack obama. >> he took the top job in 1991 under george h.w. bush, president of texas a & m university from 2002 to 2006 when president george w. bush appointed him secretary of defense. president obama asked him to stay at the pentagon making him the first defense secretary to serve in both a republican and the democratic administration, he left his post in june, 2011. at his farewell ceremony president obama awarded him the presidential award of freedom. >> the highest honor. >> this is a man i have come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply
be consequences. it appears, though, to have very little impact on the assad regime which we now have learned has begun preparing, mixing and loading gas into bombs to use on its own people. now, this comes as fighting is moving closer and closer to the rebel -- or to the assad strongholds in damascus. sarin gas is one of the most deadly chemical weapons in all of the world. it can kill within hours if this not treated, and it can kill dozens and hundreds and thousands at a time depending on how it is used. keep in mind, it only has a shelf life of about 60 days, so once you mix it, you are on the cusp of using it. as this is all happening, president assad is reaching out to several countries seeking asylum, he's apparently reached out to cuba, venezuela and ecuador, also several arab countries have reached out, the possibility of offering him asylum. now, none of this seems to have changed assad's mind. a spokesman for him, though, is saying he will never leave syria, and he would never use chemical weapons. clearly, megyn, things are happening in syria that have a potential for a very deadly ou
that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people, but suffice it to say we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur. gwen: but given the lessons of libya and egypt, what -- places where we intervened and felt we had, to what does take action mean? >> to lower expectations about what we can achieve by intervention. the situation in syria was getting so much that the costs of inaction were becoming so high they outweighed the risk of doing nothing. clearly the administration has come to that point. the radicalization of the opposition is one big point. they worry if he loses control it might fall into the hands of an al qaeda-type group. they also worry that that group might be the strongest group post assad and that sweg ways into an afghanistan kind of nightmare. it's spilling over to all the neighbors, many of whom are close allies of ours, jordan, turkey. i felt the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally
's president bashar al-assad. we'll ask israeli ambassador michael oren about the threat of chemical weapons in syria. ♪ energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. [ male announcer ] how coul
clear that with assad in power there is no possibility, none whatever, for democratic process in syria. for years syria has been one of the most repressive countries in the world according to the state department rights reports, analytical studies by freedom house. political dissidents were routinely in prisons or disappeared and journalists were silenced. human-rights activists operated underground living in constant fear of the dreaded -- mr reuel marc gerecht 23 -- assad was cast by many as a, quote, reformer but his terrible treatment of his own people should have been a strong indication of what he was really all about. callie government treats its people the true testament to its character. callie government treats its own people in vindication of how it will act on the world stage. we have seen how assad operates in the region and how his ties to iran and hezbollah have strengthened over the years. iran has desperately sought to bolster the regime in damascus, its only true ally in the region. this has meant providing weapons, logistical support and tactical advice to syrian gov
to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> all right. talk about this here now is syndicated radio talk show host my great pal john. john, the president said there will be serious consequences. does that mean we'll go to war? >> we are at war. this is a civil war in syria and the u.s. is sponsoring the coalition that means to regime change in damascus. that's the coalition of cairo, morrissey ankora. we're at war. >> the question is coming back to the president's statement i thought, john, we detected movement whether it's parts or trucks or whatever, if we detected movement, movement that might lead chemical weapons let's say, for example to go to hezbollah we should take action we the united states. >> the sad story, larry, is that april 5th, 2003, iraq moved its wmd, all of it including weapons systems that can launch the grad and supergrad missi
they do to the assad regime in syria when its own people suffer. . . unef poor broadcasting decisions, in-house fighting, the outright nepotism at the broadcasting agencies. those committed to democracy need to work harder at making allies in that region right now 67% of the iranian people want an end to that regime, what a western-style democracy, do not want a theocracy and there is no reason that number shouldn't be 87%. >> this isn't the carrot and stick of traditional diplomacy. it's certainly not a grand bargain with a regime but it's a focus on the people of iran with a message that they are better than their government, and i think that is part of the philosophy. unfortunately, let me make this point, because i have seen this in administration after administration. i saw the bush administration go silent on the north korean human rights abuses when and bargained with a regime during the end of that administration. we will likely see an impulse of the same with the obama administration in iran, and that means congress will have to push very hard to see that human rights and dr. c.
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)